Wandering Road of Insanity

ancientart:

Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.
This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections, 33.35.3.

Reblogged from transomclimber

ancientart:

Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.

This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections33.35.3.

Reblogged from helpfulharrie

mylittledoxy:

Support » http://www.patreon.com/doxydoo
Guest » http://www.patreon.com/seel

Reblogged from upwiththekai

nonelikerae:

All I want to do is explore with a pup!

(Source: dayzea)

micdotcom:

Former Ohio governor Ted Strickland tried to live on minimum wage. It didn’t go well.

Former Democratic governor of Ohio Ted Strickland tried to live on minimum wage for a week and, in his own words, he “didn’t make it.”
In an op-ed for POLITICO, Strickland explains how he failed in his attempt to live for just seven days on $77, the amount the “Live the Wage” campaign estimates is left in a 40-hour minimum wage employee’s weekly pay of $290 after accounting for taxes and housing. Strickland, a Harvard fellow and well-off political operative, was clearly unprepared for just how quickly expenses added up. He had spent his $77 by Thursday after realizing his meager budget left him without the money necessary even to pay for public transportation.
Common misperception about minimum wage workers | Follow micdotcom 

Reblogged from heroprincesslucina

micdotcom:

Former Ohio governor Ted Strickland tried to live on minimum wage. It didn’t go well.

Former Democratic governor of Ohio Ted Strickland tried to live on minimum wage for a week and, in his own words, he “didn’t make it.”

In an op-ed for POLITICO, Strickland explains how he failed in his attempt to live for just seven days on $77, the amount the “Live the Wage” campaign estimates is left in a 40-hour minimum wage employee’s weekly pay of $290 after accounting for taxes and housing. Strickland, a Harvard fellow and well-off political operative, was clearly unprepared for just how quickly expenses added up. He had spent his $77 by Thursday after realizing his meager budget left him without the money necessary even to pay for public transportation.

Common misperception about minimum wage workers | Follow micdotcom 

thetwistedrope:

satdeshret:

I am a terrible person and never got around to it so I’m gonna give him some today when I give some to…. Is it Heru-Wer’s or Set’s day? I always get the first 3 days completely mixed up.

The day after O is Heru-wer.
Should be okay to give it to him a little late, though. I gave him a cupcake last night- a day late for my festivities. So yeah. I don’t think he’ll complain over late offerings. Beats no offerings at all.
You’ll have to let me know how it goes.

Osiris = “Big O”…. Big O = …


Hunh. I guess it works. ;^.^

Reblogged from thetwistedrope

thetwistedrope:

satdeshret:

I am a terrible person and never got around to it so I’m gonna give him some today when I give some to…. Is it Heru-Wer’s or Set’s day? I always get the first 3 days completely mixed up.

The day after O is Heru-wer.

Should be okay to give it to him a little late, though. I gave him a cupcake last night- a day late for my festivities. So yeah. I don’t think he’ll complain over late offerings. Beats no offerings at all.

You’ll have to let me know how it goes.

Osiris = “Big O”…. Big O = …

Hunh. I guess it works. ;^.^

Reblogged from upwiththekai

kanapy:

Anon asked me about tutorial so I can do tutorial like this ; v ; Hope it’s easy to understand.

Reblogged from upwiththekai

shiba500:

making flat shiba

(Source: instagram.com)

Reblogged from art-of-swords

art-of-swords:

Italian Bill

  • Dated: 16th Century
  • Provenance: Bologna
  • Measurements: height 236 cm

The polearm has an iron head with long, straight cusp of square section and a double-edged hook. At the back it features a large tooth with pointed wings, while at the base there are two triangular spikes, and an octagonal socket, with two counter-curved bars. The straps come with iron nails, both faces decorated with a simple, rectangular engraving; at the front there’s a scorpion-shaped mark enclosing the letter “B”.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Reblogged from helpfulharrie

bluekomadori:

The tutorial of how I achieve watercolor effect in Sai! :) I highly recommend using real watercolor paintings (your own or ones found on the internet) as reference.

And here you can find a few useful links: 

  1. You can download the Sai file of this picture here: link 
  2. Video process of painting another picture: link
  3. The old watercolor tutorial: link
  4. Sai brushes (none of them is made by me) link + file you need to open them in Sai: link
  5. Awesome watercolor brushes made by Kyle T Webster: link

Here’s the finished painting: link

Reblogged from crispyfishsticks

glitterpiggies:

Molly enjoying a chin rub.