Wandering Road of Insanity

Reblogged from upwiththekai

somehownatural:

Memorable Tumblr Puns 

Other Tumblr Compilations

Reblogged from allmesopotamia

massarrah:

Old Babylonian “Spreadsheets”

Tabular book-keeping made its debut early in Mesopotamian history during the third millennium BCE. The earliest known table that displays headings and a horizontal axis of calculations comes from the Early Dynastic Period (Robson: p. 117). Tables were used to organise and store both quantitative and qualitative information, and provided an important tool for book-keeping. Both of the examples pictured above are Old Babylonian administrative tablets from Larsa that show tabular accounts (Sources 1, 2).

Source: E. Robson, “Accounting For Change: The Development of Tabular Book-keeping in Early Mesopotamia”

Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University. Both photos from CDLI.

allmesopotamia:

adokal:

Female head with diadem, Neo-Assyrian, ca 8th c. BCE, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), Iraq. The Metropolitan Museum of Arts, New York, USA.
source

Beautiful.

Reblogged from allmesopotamia

allmesopotamia:

adokal:

Female head with diadem, Neo-Assyrian, ca 8th c. BCE, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), Iraq. The Metropolitan Museum of Arts, New York, USA.

source

Beautiful.

Reblogged from natural-magics

(Source: )

Reblogged from kitchen-in-the-cottage

allthateverwasorwillbe:

Yarrow Salve: Tutorial 

Externally, the yarrow herb has been used for helping to heal bruises, burns, cuts, swelling, ulcers and wounds.

Reblogged from art-of-swords

art-of-swords:

Rapier Hilts

Photo #1

  • Dated: circa 1580
  • Culture: Italian
  • Maker: Francesco Duri
  • Measurements: overall length 121 cm; blade length: 105 cm; weight: 1700 g

Photo #2

  • Dated: 1610
  • Culture: German (Dresden; blade probably Solingen)
  • Measurements: overall length 119 cm; blade length: 101 cm; weight: 1430 g

Photo #3

  • Dated: 1575
  • Culture: Austrian
  • Maker Pery Juan Pockh (Goldsmith)
  • Measurements: overall length 120.6 cm; blade length: 104.3 cm; weight: 1280 g

Photo #4

  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Culture: probably German (Munich)
  • Maker(s): Daniel Sadeler (cutler), Egidius Sedeler; Etienne Delaune
  • Measurements: overall length 118 cm; blade length: 102 cm; weight 1200 g

Source: Copyright © 2014 Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

dailyotter:

Otter Serenades His Friends with an Invisible Piano
Thanks, Adrian and Laura!
[ZSL London Zoo]

Reblogged from dailyotter

dailyotter:

Otter Serenades His Friends with an Invisible Piano

Thanks, Adrian and Laura!

[ZSL London Zoo]

Reblogged from ancientart

ancientart:

Etruscan strainers at the MET.

All the shown examples date to the 6th-5th centuries BCE and are made of bronze. Strainers were were used at symposiums (drinking parties) to strain the wine or additives mixed into it.

The strainer shown in the first image is one of the most elaborate, and best-preserved, Etruscan strainer handles found to date. The MET provides the following description of this artefact:

The artist has skillfully presented a complex subject on a very small scale in the openwork square just below the handle’s attachment point. Two nude boxers appear to have just finished a bout in which one man has been knocked to his knees. Their trainer or referee holds his arms up to indicate the end of the round. On the underside of the attachment point is a delicately modeled doe lying on a wave-crest border. The handle’s base depicts a bearded male figure with fish-like legs that terminate in bearded snake heads. The strange legs form a perfect circular opening that allowed the patera to be hung when not in use. The sea monster, almost like a merman, may have been intended to ward off evil.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections12.160.834.11.814.105.365.11.122.139.1711.212.2.

Reblogged from nyurt

Reblogged from archaicwonder

archaicwonder:

Hyksos Steatite Scarab Seal with hieroglyphs, Middle Bronze, c. 1700 - 1530 BC

The Hyksos were an were mixed Semitic-Asiatic peoples from West  Asia who took over the eastern Nile Delta, ending the Thirteenth dynasty of Egypt and initiating the Second Intermediate Period (1650–1550 BC).

The Hyksos introduced the horse and chariot, the compound bow, improved battle axes, and advanced fortification techniques into Egypt. At Avaris (modern Tall al-Dabʿa) in the northeastern delta, they built their capital with a fortified camp over the remains of a Middle Kingdom town. Excavations since the 1960s have revealed a Canaanite-style temple, Palestinian-type burials, including horse burials, Palestinian types of pottery, quantities of their superior weapons, and a series of Minoan frescoes that demonstrate stylistic parallels to those of Knossos and Thera.

Although vilified in some Egyptian texts, the Hyksos had ruled as pharaohs and were listed as legitimate kings in the Turin Papyrus.  At least superficially they were Egyptianized, and they did not interfere with Egyptian culture beyond the political sphere.

More about the Hyksos…